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The Path of Oneness

Oneness is the fundamental nature of the universe. Everything is connected to everything else. We cannot see it with our eyes. We cannot feel it with our skin. Only when we dwell in silence, in meditation, can we come to this ultimate realization. Our essential nature is One.

  • Buddhists call it Emptiness.
  • Hindus call it Brahman.
  • Christians call it God or the Holy Spirit.

Beyond the world of lights and shadows, beyond words and forms, beyond names and shapes, the mystics have unveiled this Oneness and declared it to be the unchanging truth. Oneness is not a philosophy but rather the numinous aspect of religion. It has been unveiled again and again to sincere seekers of every faith.

The firsthand realization of Oneness is not easily accessed. Veils, comprised of thoughts, emotions, energy, body, and external activities cloud our true nature and cause a perception of division. The…

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Wild horses need comments

ID 94497257 © Printezis | Dreamstime.com

ID 94497257 © Printezis | Dreamstime.com

 

via BLM seeks public comment of Environmental Analysis for Wild Horse Gather in Southeastern Utah

The Secular Jurist

Mars once had ancient oceans. A photo of the Valles Marineris on Mars.

© NASA/ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY VIA GETTY IMAGES Mars once had ancient oceans. A photo of the Valles Marineris on Mars.

A study published Thursday confirmed that the cracks identified on Mars’ surface last year by the Curiosity rover are indeed evidence of ancient lakes that likely dried up about 3.5 billion years ago. The new study provides further evidence of what the climate on the Red Planet may have been like in its ancient past.

Continue reading:  Cracks on Mars Reveal a System of Ancient Lakes

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Agroha Mound

Sarson ke Khet

The archaeological site at Agroha, Haryana, commonly called the Agroha Mound, sits right beside NH9. All across the mound where rainwater has created gullies, we can see ancient bricks and walls exposed below surface level.

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Sorry. Not good news. You could read something else?

The Extinction Chronicles

50. Arctic warming is amplified by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 12 May 2015). Temperatures in the Arctic are warming considerably faster than the global average, largely because of diminishing sea ice. According to this research, the biogeophysical effect of future phytoplankton changes amplifies Arctic warming by 20%.

51. Cryptogamic covers, which comprise some of the oldest forms of terrestrial life, have recently been found to fix large amounts of nitrogen and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. They are sources of greenhouse gases, notably including nitrous oxide and methane, with higher temperatures and enhanced nitrogen deposition contributing to amplification (Global Change Biology, 7 July 2015).

52. The impact of phytoplankton is not restricted to the Arctic, either. Rather, plankton in the Southern Ocean are responsible for creating nearly half of the water droplets in the clouds during the summer…

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THE DIRT

cover-small Desert Gardens of Steve Marino / Monacelli Press

The work of landscape architect Steve Martino, FASLA, derives its interest and relevance from a simple notion: the desert landscape should be celebrated, not ignored. This notion is expertly manifested in the 21 gardens featured in the new book Desert Gardens of Steve Martino, edited by Caren Yglesias, Affil. ASLA, and photographed by Steve Gunther.

Gunther’s photographs give great insight into how a desert garden can not only be robust but even lush. It’s Martino’s brisk and charming introduction, however, that provides the book’s greatest insight into the catalogued projects.

Martino came to landscape by way of architecture, which he studied at Arizona State University in the 1960s. It was through this education that Martino says he experienced a set of epiphanies.

The first epiphany was that landscape was mostly eyewash. A client could spend tremendous amounts of money…

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Discover

Teacher and blogger Celia Knox — originally from Far North Queensland, Australia, and now living in Tokyo — recently photographed parts of Japan as it was blanketed in pink during festive hanami season. Catch a glimpse of this fleeting landscape on her blog, Celia in Tokyo, as she documents the sakura (cherry blossom) trail.


Hanami (or flower viewing) season at its peak near the Arakawa River, a short walk from Kumagaya Station in Saitama Prefecture.


A boat ride on a sakura-framed canal in Kawagoe, a popular day-trip destination from Tokyo.


Festival lanterns and sakura at dusk create a lovely landscape in Kawagoe.


A pathway surrounded by ema — plaques of wishes — at the Kawagoe Hikawa Shrine, as known as the shrine of love.


More plaques at Chureito Pagoda at Arakurayama-Sengen Park.

View all of Celia’s photographs


Ready to take your site to the next level? Get unlimited access…

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The Secular Jurist

New Zealand has stunned the energy industry by slapping a new cap on drilling for oil and gas in its waters as part of efforts to combat climate change.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced Thursday that the government will “no longer be granting any new offshore oil and gas exploration permits.”

“This is another step on our transition away from fossil fuels and towards a carbon neutral economy,” Ardern said in a speech.

Continue reading:  New Zealand stuns oil industry with offshore drilling ban

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